Difference between revisions of "Tidal flat"

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{{Definition|title=Tidal flat
 
{{Definition|title=Tidal flat
|definition= Shallow, often muddy, part of foreshore, which are covered and uncovered by the rise and fall of the tide. As a rule of thumb, a tidal flat normally develops when the relative tidal range RTR, defined as the ratio between the mean spring tidal range and the annual average HS, is higher than 15.
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|definition= Shallow, often muddy, part of [[foreshore]], which are covered and uncovered by the rise and fall of the tide. As a rule of thumb, a tidal flat normally develops when the relative tidal range RTR, defined as the ratio between the mean spring tidal range and the annual average significant wave height, is higher than 15<ref name="Karsten">Mangor, Karsten. 2004. “Shoreline Management Guidelines”. DHI Water and Environment, 294pp.</ref>.
 
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See also [[Definitions of coastal terms]].
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==Related articles==
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:[[Tidal flats from space]]
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:[[The heat budget of tidal flats]]
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:[[The backbarrier tidal flats in the southern North Sea - A multidisciplinary approach to reveal the main driving forces shaping the system]]
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:[[French case studies: Upper tidal flat evolution in the bay of Mont-Saint-Michel (NW France)]]
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==References==
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<references/>

Latest revision as of 22:07, 22 June 2020

Definition of Tidal flat:
Shallow, often muddy, part of foreshore, which are covered and uncovered by the rise and fall of the tide. As a rule of thumb, a tidal flat normally develops when the relative tidal range RTR, defined as the ratio between the mean spring tidal range and the annual average significant wave height, is higher than 15[1].
This is the common definition for Tidal flat, other definitions can be discussed in the article

See also Definitions of coastal terms.


Related articles

Tidal flats from space
The heat budget of tidal flats
The backbarrier tidal flats in the southern North Sea - A multidisciplinary approach to reveal the main driving forces shaping the system
French case studies: Upper tidal flat evolution in the bay of Mont-Saint-Michel (NW France)


References

  1. Mangor, Karsten. 2004. “Shoreline Management Guidelines”. DHI Water and Environment, 294pp.