Difference between revisions of "Copper"

From MarineBiotech Infopages
Jump to: navigation, search
(ref)
Line 3: Line 3:
  
 
|definition=Copper is a [[heavy metals|heavy metal]] with the symbol Cu and atomic number 29<ref>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper</ref>}}
 
|definition=Copper is a [[heavy metals|heavy metal]] with the symbol Cu and atomic number 29<ref>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper</ref>}}
 +
 +
 +
== Notes ==
 +
Important anthropogenic inputs of copper into the ocean include urban sewage sludge dumping, runoff from copper mines, [[antifowling paints]]<ref>Kennish, M. J. (1996): Practical Handbook of Estuarine and Marine Pollution, CRC Press 524 pp</ref>,
 +
Copper is an essential element for animals, especially decapods, [[gastropod|gastropods]] and cephalopods need copper in the respiratory pigment hemocyanin. Hemocyanin is a protein which (like hemoglobin) binds oxygen to transport it to the tissues. It is however also one of the most toxic metals to a wide spectrum of marine life.
 +
 +
 +
== See also ==

Revision as of 14:59, 23 July 2009

Definition of copper:
Copper is a heavy metal with the symbol Cu and atomic number 29[1]
This is the common definition for copper, other definitions can be discussed in the article


Notes

Important anthropogenic inputs of copper into the ocean include urban sewage sludge dumping, runoff from copper mines, antifowling paints[2], Copper is an essential element for animals, especially decapods, gastropods and cephalopods need copper in the respiratory pigment hemocyanin. Hemocyanin is a protein which (like hemoglobin) binds oxygen to transport it to the tissues. It is however also one of the most toxic metals to a wide spectrum of marine life.


See also

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper
  2. Kennish, M. J. (1996): Practical Handbook of Estuarine and Marine Pollution, CRC Press 524 pp